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The Electric Current Blog

Welcoming Another Year of JATC Graduates to the Industry

The Washington, DC construction industry has added 120 new highly-skilled electricians to its roster. Saturday, June 7th marked the 68th annual graduation ceremony for the Washington, DC, Joint Electrical Apprenticeship and Training Committee (JATC) where graduates received their diplomas and became Journeyman Electricians after completing up to five years of rigorous training.

23 Graduate from End Hunger in Calvert County Electrical Training Program

On January 6th, 23 students celebrated at a graduation hosted by End Hunger Calvert County. The training, developed and performed by the Washington, DC Joint Apprenticeship and Training Committee, was designed to prepare entry level workers for positions as trainees in the field of electrical construction. Additionally, the students are encouraged to use the program as a springboard towards the JATC’s Inside Wireman Apprenticeship program. The students completed a required 90 hours of intensive training spread out over 30 evenings.

Department of Labor Uses the JATC as a Quality Apprenticeship Example in Webinar

The JATC helped present webinar on the vision for registered apprenticeship

The Office of Apprenticeship of the U.S. Department of Labor (DoL) knows they can rely on the Electrical Alliance and its Joint Apprenticeship & Training Committee (JATC) as an example of a quality training program.

This is why they were selected to participate in DoL’s webinar, “A 21st Century Vision for Registered Apprenticeship (RA): A Brighter Future for American Workers and Employers.”

The Washington, D.C. JATC is sponsored by the Electrical Alliance, a cooperative effort between the Washington, D.C. Chapter of NECA and International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) Local 26. The JATC offers a comprehensive three- or five-year accredited telecommunications or electric apprenticeship that includes intensive classroom and on-site work. Once completed, journeymen electricians are constantly provided with continuing education on new processes that readies them for work on state-of-the-art systems.

Building Owners, Engineers, and Contractors Can Learn About Electrical Safety and Quality Installation at Largest Electrical Convention

The Electrical Alliance will host two free sessions in conjunction with the 2013 National Electrical Contractors Association (NECA) Convention and Show in Washington, D.C.

The Electrical Alliance, a cooperative effort between the electrical contractors of the Washington, D.C. Chapter of NECA and skilled craftsmen of International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) Local 26, has developed two educational sessions focused on 70E safety and NECA’s National Electrical Installation Standards (NEIS) program. These free sessions, presented by national industry experts, were designed to help building owners and managers, engineers, specifiers, and general contractors understand the latest trends and technologies in safety and quality installation. These events will provide industry enhancements that can add value to area construction projects, improve safety, and benefit the entire local electrical construction industry.

Educating the Community About the Electrical Industry

The Electrical Alliance to Sponsor Instructive Activities at National Building Museum’s Big Build on September 21st

The Electrical Alliance and its Joint Apprenticeship and Training Committee (JATC) know that in order to build a strong community, you must contribute to it. This is why they are sponsoring activities at Big Build 2013.

The National Building Museum’s Big Build is a hands-on family festival that attracts more than 4,500 visitors annually and provides the opportunity for children to work alongside experienced artisans and craftsmen as they demonstrate skills. It introduces youth to a wide range of respected professions with interactive demonstrations, games, and activities, while educating them on the built environment.

Trained at a Young Age

Certain Electrical Alliance electricians are knowledgeable about industry well before they enter their apprenticeship

All Electrical Alliance electricians engage in an intense five-year apprenticeship through the Joint Apprenticeship and Training Committee (JATC) to become journeyman electricians. Many make the decision to apply during or after high school, but some become acquainted with the industry long before they can apply to the program.

Maryland Governor Visits High-Tech High School to Promote Education Initiatives

JATC donated and installed photovoltaic (PV) system at high school to provide solar energy to the school and serve as an educational tool

The Electrical Alliance has tapped into its electrical expertise to support Maryland Governor Martin O’Malley’s education initiatives.

The Washington, D.C. Joint Apprenticeship and Training Committee (JATC) donated and installed a PV system at North Point High School in Waldorf, Md. Gov. O’Malley recently visited North Point to promote two education initiatives he proposed in this year’s budget, seeking a high-tech future of education and career readiness.

A Tradition of Intense Training

Electrical Alliance electricians mix of book smarts and hands-on experience deliver the region’s highest quality work

Searching for an electrical contractor who knows their stuff through intense education and thorough training? Look no further than Electrical Alliance contractors.

The electricians employed by Electrical Alliance contractors all undergo a meticulous three- or five-year accredited telecommunications or electric apprenticeship through the Washington, D.C. Joint Apprenticeship and Training Committee (JATC). The apprenticeship includes both classroom and project site work. Journeymen electricians are also constantly provided with continuing education on new processes to ready them for work on tomorrow’s systems.

The JATC is sponsored by the Electrical Alliance, a cooperative effort between the electrical contractors of the Washington, D.C. Chapter of National Electrical Contractors Association (NECA) and the craftsmen of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) Local 26.

Electrical Contractors 2012 Safety Resolution: Review, Refresh, Renew, Reduce

For most, safety is a guiding principle. For contractors of the Electrical Alliance, a cooperative effort between the Washington, DC Chapter of NECA and the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) Local 26, safety extends well beyond the immediate scope. It’s the guiding principle in a personal, work and post-work environment.

Accidents involving improper electrical maintenance, mechanical failures, falling and aerial lift mishaps can unfortunately happen all too easily. Research from The Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFI) found that from 2003-2009, worker contact with electrical currents was responsible for 1,573 fatal workplace accidents, 772 in the construction industry alone.* Contact with overhead power lines; contact with wiring, transformers, or other electrical components; and contact with electric current from machines, tools, appliance or light fixtures, are the top three categories responsible for on-the-job electrical death.

Because of this, Andrew Porter, executive director of the Washington D.C. Chapter of National Electrical Contractors Association (NECA) operates under the “tell them, tell them again, and then tell them what we told them” principle concerning safety. Porter said, “These findings emphasize the extreme value of proper safety practices that start personally with correct safety knowledge, and are continuously encouraged by supervisors.”